lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you
lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you

lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you

(via kutiecake)

shadowsfate:

Stumbled upon this on Facebook today and couldn’t stop laughing. 

(via dizzykins7)

spookycyborg:

the reviews say “gritty realism” but the heart whispers “suburban straight boy libertarian fantasy with a limited color palette”

(via spooky-ragazza)

haidaspicciare:

Alonzo Bodden
haidaspicciare:

Alonzo Bodden
haidaspicciare:

Alonzo Bodden
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
downeyjred:

#listen up fives #a ten is speaking
“YOU COME INTO MY GAME, IN MY HOUSE, AND BRING UP THE TRUE BRUJAH.”
— our storyteller (via outofcontextdnd)
“1. push yourself to get up before the rest of the world - start with 7am, then 6am, then 5:30am. go to the nearest hill with a big coat and a scarf and watch the sun rise.

2. push yourself to fall asleep earlier - start with 11pm, then 10pm, then 9pm. wake up in the morning feeling re-energized and comfortable.

3. get into the habit of cooking yourself a beautiful breakfast. fry tomatoes and mushrooms in real butter and garlic, fry an egg, slice up a fresh avocado and squirt way too much lemon on it. sit and eat it and do nothing else.

4. stretch. start by reaching for the sky as hard as you can, then trying to touch your toes. roll your head. stretch your fingers. stretch everything.

5. buy a 1L water bottle. start with pushing yourself to drink the whole thing in a day, then try drinking it twice.

6. buy a beautiful diary and a beautiful black pen. write down everything you do, including dinner dates, appointments, assignments, coffees, what you need to do that day. no detail is too small.

7. strip your bed of your sheets and empty your underwear draw into the washing machine. put a massive scoop of scented fabric softener in there and wash. make your bed in full.

8. organise your room. fold all your clothes (and bag what you don’t want), clean your mirror, your laptop, vacuum the floor. light a beautiful candle.

9. have a luxurious shower with your favourite music playing. wash your hair, scrub your body, brush your teeth. lather your whole body in moisturiser, get familiar with the part between your toes, your inner thighs, the back of your neck.

10. push yourself to go for a walk. take your headphones, go to the beach and walk. smile at strangers walking the other way and be surprised how many smile back. bring your dog and observe the dog’s behaviour. realise you can learn from your dog.

11. message old friends with personal jokes. reminisce. suggest a catch up soon, even if you don’t follow through. push yourself to follow through.

13. think long and hard about what interests you. crime? sex? boarding school? long-forgotten romance etiquette? find a book about it and read it. there is a book about literally everything.

14. become the person you would ideally fall in love with. let cars merge into your lane when driving. pay double for parking tickets and leave a second one in the machine. stick your tongue out at babies. compliment people on their cute clothes. challenge yourself to not ridicule anyone for a whole day. then two. then a week. walk with a straight posture. look people in the eye. ask people about their story. talk to acquaintances so they become friends.

15. lie in the sunshine. daydream about the life you would lead if failure wasn’t a thing. open your eyes. take small steps to make it happen for you.”

(via elauxe)

A self care list. I’ve been working on this. I promise it’s worth it.

(via sweetbloodsomalia)

(via dizzykins7)

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - LINE OF ACTION

The line of action doesn’t necessarily need to be drawn in. As long as you think about it while drawing, your gesture or posing will be stronger. It gives a direction to the pose, a force that runs though, or simply a visual pathways to guide your audience. Use it always!

Norm

(via anatomicalart)

Q

Anonymous asked:

why is "hate breeds more hate" a bad thing to say?

A

edwardspoonhands:

lookatthisfuckingoppressor:

Oh so many reasons.

1) it equates the anger of the oppressed to the hate of their oppressors.
2) it blames oppressed groups for their oppression. Bigotry doesn’t exist because people hate bigots. It exists because oppressed people oppose it. It exists because of bigots and because of privileged folks being complicit or tacitly condoning systems of oppression.
3) it’s fundamentally untrue. Hatred of oppression doesn’t lead to more hatred; it leads to progress.
4) it is used to attack any attempt by oppressed people to obtain liberation. Point out that something or someone is repulsively racist and all of a sudden you’re “breeding more hate”.

It’s a fundamental misrepresentation of reality that blames victims and excuses fucked up behavior.

EDIT *before my reply because it’s important* before reading this post I would have had a hard time articulating why “hate breeds more hate” is a weird thing to say to activists. Because, obviously, people hating each other causes lots of bad things. I would have thought it was a weird thing to say, but if someone had said it I would’ve been like “Yeah…I mean…I guess…”

Because the sentence subtly and dismissively shifts the action and opinion of the activist away from the oppression and on to the people they’re arguing with about the oppression. It’s a way of winning an argument by changing the argument..very clever. And I never would have picked up on it without this post.

So, to continue with what I originally wrote…

Hatred of a terrible thing is one of the most wonderful human emotions. Anger at inequality and oppression LITERALLY CREATED AMERICA…smh.

We found that, upon exposure to sexist humor, men higher in sexism discriminated against women by allocating larger funding cuts to a women’s organization than they did to other organizations.

We also found that, in the presence of sexist humor, participants believed the other participants would approve of the funding cuts to women’s organizations. We believe this shows that humorous disparagement creates the perception of a shared standard of tolerance of discrimination that may guide behavior when people believe others feel the same way.

The research indicates that people should be aware of the prevalence of disparaging humor in popular culture, and that the guise of benign amusement or “it’s just a joke” gives it the potential to be a powerful and widespread force that can legitimize prejudice in our society

— Thomas E. Ford, professor of psychology at Western Carolina University (via baebees)

(via stfu-moffat)